BREMER BAROCKORCHESTER
BREMER BAROCK ORCHESTER

BACH to the Roots!

BACH to the Roots!

The Bre­mer Barock­or­ches­ter reim­agi­nes the art of the baro­que geni­us J.S. Bach with the pre­sen­ta­ti­on of their first CD, which was released in the autumn of 2020. J.S. Bach’s mas­ter­pie­ces per­cei­ved with new arran­ge­ments, some by the ensem­ble them­sel­ves, such as the recon­struc­tion of the Vio­lin Con­cer­to in D minor BWV 1052R. This pro­gram also inclu­des the orches­tral suite in B minor and the 5th Bran­den­burg Con­cer­to.

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Barock: Exotisch

Baro­que: Exo­tic

In this per­for­mance, the ensem­ble illu­mi­na­tes the influ­en­ces of the so-cal­­led “New World” on the Euro­pean com­po­sers of the Baro­que era. It also takes a look at the other side of the Atlan­tic, whe­re flu­te con­cer­tos and sona­tas were com­po­sed in the Colom­bi­an Ama­zon. A color­ful expe­di­ti­on through the exo­tic sounds of the Baro­que era.

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Der stürmende Äolus

The stor­ming Aeo­lus

In this extra­or­di­na­ry pro­gram, Doro­thee Ober­lin­ger and the BBO pre­sent late Baro­que music, such as the famous flu­te con­cer­to “La Not­te” by Anto­nio Vival­di and works by G.Ph. Tele­mann, as well as music from the 16th cen­tu­ry. The soloist and ensem­ble explo­re the world of baro­que flu­te music, while pre­sen­ting works from all over Euro­pe that con­ti­nue to vir­tuo­si­cal­ly out­do each other, but also skil­ful­ly show­ca­se the can­ta­bi­le natu­re of the baro­que flu­te.

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»Der Teufelsgeiger«

“The Devil’s Vio­li­nist”

In this pro­gram, the Bre­mer Barock­or­ches­ter pres­ents vir­tuo­so com­po­si­ti­ons from the baro­que Ita­li­an vio­lin school. Tog­e­ther with the soloist, the ensem­ble fol­lows in the foots­teps of the com­po­ser and vio­li­nist Giu­sep­pe Tar­ti­ni, who was known as the “devil’s vio­li­nist” during his life­time. Tar­ti­ni clai­med to have encoun­te­red Luci­fer in a dream and thus inspi­red to wri­te one of his dar­ing com­po­si­ti­ons. Con­clu­ding the pro­gram with Con­cer­ti Gros­si in the tra­di­ti­on of Arcan­ge­lo Corel­li, the grand­mas­ter of the foref­a­thers of the Ita­li­an orches­tral prac­ti­ce.

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Eine kleine Nachtmusik in Madrid

A litt­le night music in Madrid

Wolf­gang Ama­de­us Mozart meets Fan­dan­go in a pro­gram that com­bi­nes famous works by the Aus­tri­an com­po­ser with music by Lui­gi Boc­cheri­ni, and the expres­si­ve per­cep­ti­on of the Fla­men­co dance. The focus of the con­cert is on the the­me of Sere­na­ta, the com­bi­na­ti­on of Mozart’s inter­pre­ta­ti­on of the clas­si­cal sere­na­de and the swir­ling sounds of a Spa­nish capi­tal, which Boc­cheri­ni immor­ta­li­zed in his com­po­si­ti­ons, such as “La Musi­ca not­tur­na del­le stra­de di Madrid.”

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Music for the Kings

Music for the Kings

In this con­cert, the Bre­mer Barock­or­ches­ter trans­port the audi­ence into the world of musi­cal thea­ter, com­bi­ning works from French and Eng­lish com­po­sers. In Eng­land, during the second half of the 17th cen­tu­ry, the musi­cal style of its Euro­pean neigh­bors on the oppo­si­te side of the Eng­lish Chan­nel was par­ti­cu­lar­ly fashion­ab­le. The­re­fo­re, some French attri­bu­tes found their way into the dra­ma­tic music of com­po­sers such as Hen­ry Pur­cell. With Purcell’s com­po­si­ti­ons, he shaped the musi­cal life of Lon­don and was respon­si­ble for the dawn of a new era in thea­tri­cal Eng­lish music. This pro­gram fea­tures French com­po­si­ti­ons by the musi­ci­ans of Lou­is XIV, who, begin­ning with Jean-Bap­­tis­­te Lul­ly, had no small merit in the Euro­­pe-wide and cen­­tu­­ries-long bril­li­an­ce of the Ver­sailles court. Lul­ly, a young dan­cer and musi­ci­an, beca­me one of the foun­ders of the French baro­que ope­ra. Its cha­rac­te­ris­tic over­tu­re beca­me his trade­mark, the magni­ficent style of com­po­si­ti­on equi­va­lent with […]

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Musik ohne Grenzen

Music without bor­ders

The fact that Georg Phil­ipp Tele­mann wro­te several thousand com­po­si­ti­ons in the cour­se of his life­time is enough to ent­i­ce skep­ti­cal asto­nish­ment, but that he was ver­sed in all natio­nal musi­cal styles is bor­de­ring on the impos­si­ble. This musi­cal jack-of-all-tra­­des remains unri­va­led in this aspect: some­ti­mes in French, some­ti­mes Ita­li­an, some­ti­mes North Ger­man, the Ham­burg mas­ter takes us on a jour­ney into his color­ful world. This con­cert con­sists of the breath­ta­king con­cer­tos for tra­ver­so and recor­der, as well as the over­tu­re “Les Nati­ons”.

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Schrank II

Schrank II

In this con­cert, the Bre­mer Barock­or­ches­ter embarks on a voya­ge of dis­co­very into the fabu­lous music collec­tion of the Dres­den Hof­ka­pel­le known as “Schrank II”. The archi­ve, for the most part con­tai­ning the esta­te of the famous Vival­di pupil Georg Pisen­del, was alrea­dy crea­ted in the 18th cen­tu­ry. It con­tains well-known, along with part­ly rare­ly heard manu­scripts and copies of the gre­at mas­ters from the era of the Saxon-Polish Uni­on. The pin­na­cle era of the orches­tra, which was famous throughout Euro­pe and who­se mem­bers inclu­ded legen­da­ry musi­ci­ans such as Fran­ces­co Maria Ver­a­ci­ni, Johann Joa­chim Quantz and Jan Dis­mas Zelen­ka, among others. In accordance with its high qua­li­ty, works have been repeated­ly dedi­ca­ted to the orches­tra. Famous com­po­sers, such as Anto­nio Vival­di, had their music pre­mie­red by the Dres­den orches­tra.

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»Simplicissimus«

“Sim­pli­cis­si­mus”

With various works of the ear­ly and late baro­que, the Bre­mer Barock­or­ches­ter exhi­bits the diver­se sound and vivid­ness of ensem­ble music from the 17th cen­tu­ry, an era cha­rac­te­ri­zed by poli­ti­cal tur­moil and hos­ti­le con­flicts. The Aus­tri­an com­po­ser H.I.F. von Biber and Swa­bi­an com­po­ser Speer crea­ted worlds that were prac­ti­cal­ly “exo­tic” for the time; by set­ting Hun­ga­ri­an or Greek dan­ces, migh­ty batt­les and fun­e­ral songs to music. Fur­ther­mo­re, jester’s tales, assor­ted ani­mal sounds and altog­e­ther a world of sound can be heard, which seems to be ahead of its time through the use of nume­rous unusu­al play­ing tech­ni­ques.

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Viva la Folia

Viva la Folia

From wild­ly vir­tuo­sic string con­cer­tos to inti­ma­te love songs, covering the ent­i­re spec­trum of human emo­ti­on. Rare­ly per­for­med works of the ear­ly and late Ita­li­an Baro­que peri­od are per­for­med along­side com­po­si­ti­ons such as the famous Dou­ble Con­cer­to for two vio­lins in A minor RV522, the alter­na­ti­on of vocal cham­ber music and the full sound of the string orches­tra shows all of the diver­se facets of baro­que mad­ness.

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